The Daily Skein

All the craft that’s fit to make.

Last Minute Gifts for Knitters December 8, 2011

Filed under: Knitting Projects,Musings,spinning — Cailyn @ 5:19 pm
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I feel slightly dirty.  I was on Facebook and I clicked on an ad.  And the ad was right, I did find lots of things to buy!  It was an ad for CafePress and it had a picture of a cartoony orange cat knitting.  Well, I was hooked and I clicked (making both CafePress and Facebook very happy).   There’s a lot of great knitting stuff on CafePress- not yarn or needles or notions, obviously, but totes and shirts and the all-important coffee mugs.  Here’s a few designs that I think should go on any knitter’s wishlist!  (Yes, they’re already on mine.)

 

“The Answers” to all those common questions in totes, shirts, etc

 

Similar theme, different questions.

 

Kitchener stitch instructions

 

Cute cat in tote and shirt form.  This is the one that did me in.

 

 

Instant Knitter buttons and shirts!  Also in Spinner!  (This shop’s got a button or shirt for just about everybody who loves coffee.)

 

Spinning button.  So true.

 

From Crazy Aunt Purl.

 

Not a fan of knitting cats?  How about a knitting penguin?  (also, penguin ninja)

 

What, why are you looking at me like that?

 

 

Shirts, etc, with the important math in life.  Or, the life cycle of yarn.

 

Just one more row… really!

 

Sock Loot! August 5, 2011

Filed under: fiber,spinning,Yarn — Cailyn @ 11:09 am
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Now the part that you’ve all been waiting for.  Or dreading, depending on how much you like or hate when bloggers post things they’ve bought at events you didn’t go to.  You might want to skip this post if you’re the jealous type.

 

First up, the random stuff.  Preordered swag (glass, pen, button [not shown {but cool}]).  I just wanted to see how many types of brackets I could use in one sentence.  And a high speed whorl for my wheel, which means I can put more twist in per treadle when I spin laceweight.  And there’s a teal aluminum needle gauge.  It was a complete impulse buy near the register while I was buying the whorl, but I’ve always kind of wanted one.  They had three shades of blue!  It was hard to choose.  The gauge goes down to size 000 size 000000 which looks terrifyingly small!  Oh, and the pen lights up.  Because why not?

 

115_5617

 

I got a new mug from Jennie the Potter, although I didn’t get to the booth fast enough to get her special Sock Summit mug.  She said they sold out in the first 20 minutes the market was open!  Yipes.  Anyway, I got this knitting mug to go with the spinning mug I use every morning for coffee.  This one has yarn in turquoise with white and black sheep; the one I have already is dark blue yarn with brown and black sheep.  They look great together, even though I’m only showing you the new one. 

115_5618  115_5619

 

 

Then there’s the fibers!  Let’s see, shall we go in chronological order or pretty order?  Let’s go chronological.

 

We stopped by Crown Mountain Farms, who had all kinds of fun blends and undyed fibers.  I got some incredibly soft undyed yak/merino (50/50).  This stuff is what I imagine clouds feel like.  It’s that light and fluffy.  Living in Seattle, it’s kind of the color of clouds too.  I think this will be spun up to keep it’s fluffiness and made into a warm, soft scarf for Lowell.

 

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After that, my eye was caught by a stunning 100% tussah silk by Teresa Ruch Designs, but then I fell in love with this alpaca/silk blend (80/20).  It’s black alpaca laced through with bright shining silk in teal and violet.  It looks like an opal.  I haven’t had much luck spinning alpaca before, but I couldn’t, literally couldn’t, put this fiber down.  I have no idea what I’ll spin it into yet… It’s almost too pretty as a hank of fiber to spin up!

 

115_5629

 

I went down to Portland with my Tiger Mt spindle but nothing to spin on it.  Even though I can spin just as well on my spindle as my wheel, I prefer to spin 2 oz or less on my spindle.  For some reason to me, spinning a 4oz hunk of fiber seems too “big” for a spindle project.  And for some reason (this is where I think I might have a problem) I don’t like splitting a 4 oz braid into two 2 oz segments.  I want to only have 2 total oz of fiber for my spindle.  And that’s hard to find, since more fiber is sold in 4 oz chunks.  But I did find one vendor selling fiber in bulk and in a great color, so I bought 2 oz  of merino/silk from her.  I think it’s 50/50, but I can’t remember and didn’t write it down.  Destined to be laceweight.

 

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Hm, silk seems to be a recurring theme here.  There’s silk in this next purchase from RainCity Fiber Arts too.  In fact, it’s merino/yak/silk (60/20/20).  Second yak purchase in two days, hmm… 2 oz and super pretty.  Also soft enough to make a cotton ball weep.

 

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One of my favorites: a gorgeous merino/silk (80/20) blend from Fiber Optic Yarns.  Again with the silk!  What’s up with that?  The roving is dyed from a light aqua to a dark, dark indigo color.  I walked by this booth a few times, my eye always drawn to the “gradient dyed” fiber.  They had a number of other colorways, including a lovely golden-orange to purple.  I tried to resist buying this.  I really did!  They probably thought I was stalking them the way I kept walking by, looking at this, then walking away slowly.  I was doing yet another walk-by when I thought of the perfect project for this fiber- a shawl that fades slowly from one color to the other, like this one from the Yarn Harlot.  I imagined myself carefully dividing the fiber in half, spinning each color section as a laceweight single,  plying so that everything lines up right (or mostly right), knitting up a beautiful shawl that fades from aqua to indigo and then it was all over.  I had to have it.  I can’t wait to spin it.

 

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After I decided to spend money on that, I made a decision on another item I’d been waffling over.  A Jenkins Woodworking “Kuchulu” Turkish spindle.  They had one that was so small and cute that I couldn’t stop thinking about it.  It weighs about .3 oz (9g) and is just about as long as my index finger.  It’s designed to be a pocket-sized spindle and it is!  I can’t get over how adorable it is.  So small and cute and it spins like a dream.  I’ll write more about what makes a Turkish spindle interesting later.  The shaft is walnut and the wings are made from amboyna, which is a wood from southeast Asia.  I have a special spot in my heart for red woods.  Ed said that he doesn’t use amboyna anymore, so mine is special!  I love going to festivals and talking to the people who actually make the things I’m buying.

 

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I was going to use the teal merino/silk I’d gotten the day before to try out the Kuchulu, but I wandered by Crown Mountain Farms again and saw this lovely pencil roving that I hadn’t noticed before.  It was a great price, 2 oz, merino/tencel (50/50) and a color I love.

 

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I also picked up some Lorna’s Laces Solemate (colorway Navy Pier), their newest yarn line.  It’s made from 55% superwash wool, 15% nylon, and 30% Outlast.  Outlast is a viscose fiber which is a man-made plant (cellulose) fiber, like rayon or bamboo.  It’s supposed to “regulate microclimate” to keep you from getting too hot or too cold.  Outlast was originally designed for space suits using “phase change materials” coated with polyester.  I’m sure I’ll be writing more about this when I knit up this yarn- I’m pretty excited to try it, because my feet are always too cold or too hot!

 

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Yes, I only bought one skein of yarn.  That’s it.  I have a lot of yarn already and I was drawn to the fibers more than the yarns.  The yarn selection was stunning, though!  Lastly (well, really first) I bought three Japanese stitch dictionaries.  This might seem like an embarrassment of riches, but it’s also a bit of a curse.  Now I want to put every single pattern on a pair of socks or mittens or a hat.  There are so many great designs.  Hmm, I’d better get started knitting!

 

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Oh, and I also bought a set of Signature Needles Size 1 (2.25mm) DPNs.  But I didn’t take their picture.

 

Sir Elton July 27, 2011

Filed under: patterns — Cailyn @ 10:47 pm
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I designed a pair of socks for the Sock Summit edition of Tangled (I may have mentioned this before).  The issue went live today, so I can show you Sir Elton!

 

sir_elton2

(picture shamelessly “borrowed” from Tangled)

 

These socks were originally named “Adara.”  Since the Tangled issue has an 80’s theme, like the Summit, the patterns got renamed with 80’s music names.  We submitted a few of our favorite musicians/bands for them to choose from.

 

These socks grew out of a Celtic knot-esque cable I designed.  I wanted it to grow organically from the ribbing and I wanted a stockinette foot.  I particularly love the way the side cables taper down to just one stitch on each side before the heel.

 

These socks are available for $6 at Tangled.  You can use the code SOCKSUMMIT11 to get $1 off the pattern until August 14.  And don’t forget to stop by and see these socks in person at the Tangled booth if you’re at the Sock Summit! (More on that tomorrow.  I have to get too sleep so I’ll be awake for my morning class!)

 

Shawl Swatch Watch June 9, 2011

Filed under: Knitting Projects — Cailyn @ 4:51 pm
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I just avoided spilling a full cup of coffee as I tripped over a power cable.  Miracle!

 

Also a miracle, I have finished (sort of) the swatch for my handspun shawl.  It was delayed by two full froggings, three partial froggings, a sudden spurt of spring cleaning, and a kayaking trip.

 

IMG_5122

 

The swatch is about half the number of stitches of the finished design but has all the right elements in it.  The bottom pattern is from Nancy Bush’s Knitted Lace of Estonia; the middle and upper pattern are from The Haapsalu Shawl.  The upper pattern (one of the numerous “paw” patterns) will be most of the shawl with garter borders.  I won’t be putting a traditional border around the whole shawl- I like the slightly modern look of a straight-edged shawl.  And I think knitting a border for a 60×20 inch shawl would kill me.  Literally.  I would keel over from sheer boredom just trying to pick up all the stitches for it!

 

IMG_5125  IMG_5126  IMG_5127

 

Here’s the problem:  I’m not sure I’m happy with the look of the thing.

 

I’m pretty happy with the general layout and patterns I chose (which wasn’t easy!)  I’m not entirely certain about the paw pattern, but I’m not going to revise the whole thing again.  The drape is lovely and the yarn is great.  But I’m not sure if it’s lacy enough.  Is it too… solid?  Not enough space between the strands of yarn?

 

As it stands, the swatch gives me about 6 stitches to the inch.  That should make the whole shawl about 14 inches wide.  I’m debating casting on with a set of size 5 or 6 needles for the actual shawl.  That should both make the shawl lacier and wider.  I’m not planning on re-swatching, though (yes, I live dangerously).  I’ve had enough of swatches!  I’m just not sure… part of the problem is that I don’t have a set of 5s or 6s.  If I like the way it looks now, I can start the shawl immediately.  But if I want to use bigger needles, I have to sneak out to the store, which isn’t really close by.

 

I can’t decide.

 

Bubble Stream May 17, 2011

Filed under: patterns — Cailyn @ 1:19 pm
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000_0108 bw

 

A while back, I was asked by Suzan at Barking Dog Yarn to design some socks for her Ravelry group’s KAL (knitalong, for those not in the know).  The design uses her Opposite’s Attract line of yarn, which I think is a really cool idea for colorways.  I like so many of the colors she’s got.  The yarn itself is super soft and very nice to knit with.

 

The end result of this collaboration was Bubble Stream.  In keeping with the “opposites” theme, the socks feature a mirrored design, with a mock cable crossing the top of the foot in opposite directions.  This means that the foot of the sock is worked differently for each sock- I was told that this helped some of the second sock syndrome!  I’ll keep that in mind for future designs.

 

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The mock cable ribbing on the cuff knits up fast, easy, and fun.  While I made these socks longer to show off the colorway, I think they’d look great as ankle socks since the really interesting part is on the foot.

 

This pattern is pretty long, since each foot has different instructions.  I recommend downloading the PDF instead of reading it below.

 

115_5506  000_0114

 

Errata

4/2/11: The symbol for m1 (M on the charts) was not in the key. 

4/3/11: In the instructions for the heel turn for both socks, Row 3 should read “Sl 1, p6, p2tog, p1, turn.”  In the instructions for the heel turn for both socks, Row 4 should read “Sl 1, p7, ssk, k1, turn.”

4/14/11: Clarified the heel flap instructions on Row 1 and 2.  Changed the optional shorter toe charts on the last page to the correct number of sts.

 

Bubble Stream

Download the PDF: Bubble Stream

  • Finished Size: 7.5” midfoot circumference
  • Yarn: Barking Dog Yarns Opposites Attract [100% Superwash merino] 400 yds/4 oz Color: Tristan and Isolde; 1 skein
  • Needle: Size 1 (2.25mm) or size needed to obtain gauge
  • Gauge: 40 sts x 58 rows = 4” in Chart B
  • Notions: Scrap yarn or stitch holder, 3 stitch markers, tapestry needle

 

Special Stitches

Mock Cable: Insert right needle purlwise into third stitch on the left needle. Pull this stitch up and over the first two stitches and off the needle. Knit the first stitch on the left needle, yarn over, knit the second stitch. Mock cable completed.

m1: Insert left needle under the strand between the stitches from front to back and knit into the back of the new stitch

m1p: Insert left needle under the strand between the stitches from back to front and purl into the front of the new stitch

k tbl: knit through the back loop

sm: slip marker

 

Notes

The pattern begins by casting on in “Color 1.” Either miniskein of Opposites Attract can be Color 1; it is just a shorter way of saying “use the color that you’re not using for the leg of the sock.”

Charts for each sock are shown at the end of the instructions.  Charts A and B are the same for both socks and are shown twice.

The sock measures about 7 inches long by the time Chart E/H is completed; the last part of the pattern has a suggestion for shortening the sock if needed. If you don’t need a shorter sock, then this advice can be ignored.

 

Right Sock

Cuff

CO 64 sts in Color 1. Join in the round, being careful not to twist. “Color 1” can be either color.

Work Rounds 1-4 of Chart A until work measures 1 inch from cast on, ending on Round 4.  Chart A repeats 4 times around the sock.

Cut Color 1 and join Color 2.

Leg

Work Rounds 1-4 of Chart B until leg is desired length (shown 6 inches) ending on Round 4. Chart B repeats 4 times around the sock.

Heel

To center the heel flap and instep design, the first stitch of the round is knitted and placed on the heel needle as the first stitch of the heel.

Row 1 (RS): Knit the first st of the round, turn. This is the first heel stitch.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1, purl 15, m1p, p15, turn. 1 st increased.

Heel will be worked back and forth over these 32 stitches. The heel stitches, including the stitch from Row 1, should be on one needle. Put the other 33 stitches on a spare needle, scrap yarn, or stitch holder as desired.

Row 3 (RS): *Sl 1, k1* 16x, turn.

Row 4 (WS): Sl 1, p31, turn.

Row 5 (RS): *Sl 1, k1* 16x, turn.

Repeat Rows 4-5 another 14 times, for a total of 32 rows (16 slipped stitches on each side of the heel flap) ending on Row 5.

Turn Heel

Row 1 (WS): Sl 1, p17, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 2 (RS): Sl 1, k5, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 3: Sl 1, p6, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 4: Sl 1, p7, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 5: Sl 1, p8, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 6: Sl 1, k9, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 7: Sl 1, p10, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 8: Sl 1, k11, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 9: Sl 1, p12, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 10: Sl 1, k13, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 11: Sl 1, p14, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 12: Sl 1, k15, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 13: Sl 1, p16, p2tog, turn.

Row 14: Sl 1, k16, ssk, do not turn. 18 sts remain.

Gusset

Pick up and knit 16 sts along the heel flap. Instep: K2, *p5, k3,* 3x, p5, k2. Pick up and knit 16 sts along the heel flap, k7, k2tog. Mark this as the beginning of the round. The decrease takes care of the extra stitch that was increased on the heel flap. 82 sts.

The decreases for the gusset on the right side will consume instep stitches. The decreases for the gusset on the left side will consume the gusset stitches as normal. Chart C is worked once per round; it does not repeat.

K16, work next row of Chart C, knit to the end of the round.

Continue as above until all 18 rows of Chart C have been worked. 64 sts.

Foot

Chart D continues the crossover pattern from Chart C. Chart D is worked once per round; it does not repeat.

K15, work next row of Chart D, knit to the end of the round.

Work as above until all 44 rows of Chart D have been worked.

Chart E continues the crossover pattern. Chart E is worked on the left side of the instep; it does not repeat.

K37, work next row of Chart E, knit to the end of the round.

Continue as above until all 17 rows of Chart E have been worked.

Knit until foot is 1.5” shorter than desired length.

Toe

Cut Color 1 and join Color 2.

Set Up Round: K16, place marker, k32, place marker, k16.

Round 1: Knit to 3 sts before first marker, k2tog, k1, sm, k1, ssk, knit to 3 sts before second marker, k2tog, k1, sm, k1, ssk, knit to the end of the round.

Round 2: Knit all stitches.

Repeat Rounds 1-2 until 24 stitches remain.

Graft remaining stitches together. 

Weave in all ends and block if desired.

Key  Charts are not listed in the order they’re worked; Charts C-E are arranged to show the overall pattern of the foot.  Click on the charts to enlarge.

Sock 1 End   Ribbing
Chart E   Chart A
Sock 1 Foot   Leg
Chart D   Chart B
Sock 1 Gusset    
Chart C    

115_5523  000_0119

Left Sock

Cuff

CO 64 sts in Color 2. Join in the round, being careful not to twist.

Work Rows 1-4 of Chart A until work measures 1 inch from cast on, ending on Row 4. Chart A repeats 4 times around the sock.

Cut Color 2 and join Color 1.

Leg

Work Rows 1-4 of Chart B until leg is desired length (shown 6 inches) ending on Row 4. Chart B repeats 4 times around the sock.

Heel

To center the heel flap and instep design, the first stitch of the round is knitted and placed on the heel needle as the first stitch of the heel.

Row 1 (RS): Knit the first st of the round, turn. This is the first heel stitch.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1, purl 15, m1p, p15, turn. 1 st increased.

Heel will be worked back and forth over these 32 stitches. The heel stitches, including the stitch from Row 1, should be on one needle. Put the other 33 stitches on a spare needle, scrap yarn, or stitch holder as desired.

Row 3 (RS): *Sl 1, k1* 16x, turn.

Row 4 (WS): Sl 1, p31, turn.

Row 5 (RS): *Sl 1, k1* 16x, turn.

Repeat Rows 4-5 another 14 times, for a total of 32 rows (16 slipped stitches on each side of the heel flap) ending on Row 5.

Turn Heel

Row 1 (WS): Sl 1, p17, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 2 (RS): Sl 1, k5, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 3: Sl 1, p6, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 4: Sl 1, p7, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 5: Sl 1, p8, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 6: Sl 1, k9, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 7: Sl 1, p10, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 8: Sl 1, k11, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 9: Sl 1, p12, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 10: Sl 1, k13, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 11: Sl 1, p14, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 12: Sl 1, k15, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 13: Sl 1, p16, p2tog, turn.

Row 14: Sl 1, k16, ssk, do not turn.  18 sts remain.

Gusset

Pick up and knit 16 sts along the heel flap, place marker. Instep: K2, *p5, k3,* 3x, p5, k2. Pick up and knit 16 sts along the heel flap, k7, k2tog. Mark this as the beginning of the round. The decrease takes care of the extra stitch that was increased on the heel flap. 82 sts.

The decreases for the gusset on the left side will consume instep stitches. The decreases for the gusset on the right side will consume the gusset stitches as normal. Chart F is worked once per round; it does not repeat.

Knit to 3 sts before marker, work next row of Chart F, knit to the end of the round.

Continue as above until all 18 rows of Chart F have been worked. Remove marker. 64 sts.

Foot

Chart G continues the crossover pattern from Chart F. Chart G is worked once per round; it does not repeat.

K16, work next row of Chart G, knit to the end of the round.

Work as above until all 44 rows of Chart G have been worked.

Chart H continues the crossover pattern. Chart H is worked on the right side of the instep; it does not repeat.

K16, work Chart H, knit to the end of the round.

Continue as above until all 17 rows of Chart H have been worked.

Knit until foot is 1.5” shorter than desired length.

Toe

Cut Color 1 and join Color 2.

Set Up Round: K16, place marker, k32, place marker, k16.

Round 1: Knit to 3 sts before first marker, k2tog, k1, sm, k1, ssk, knit to second marker, k2tog, k1, sm, k1, ssk, knit to the end of the round.

Round 2: Knit all stitches.

Repeat Rounds 1-2 until 24 stitches remain.

Graft remaining stitches together. Weave in all ends and block if desired.

Key

Sock 2 End   Ribbing
Chart H   Chart A
Sock 2 Foot   Leg
Chart G   Chart B
Sock 2 Gusset    
Chart F    

Tip!

The sock foot should measure about 7 inches long after Chart E/H are completed. The toe is 1.5 inches long, which means that the pattern as written will be no shorter than 8.5 inches. If a shorter sock is desired, some or all of Chart E/H can be worked at the same time as some of the toe decreases. Skip the increases on the chart and only work the decreases. The rest of the toe would be worked as normal This makes the sock about 1 inch shorter. Below is an example of this, where Chart E/H are worked entirely during the toe decreases.

 

sample toe 1 sample toe 2
Sample Toe 1 Sample Toe 2

 

115_5503 2  115_5504

 

Please Note: If you find them or have any questions, please let me know by posting a comment or emailing me, dailyskein@gmail.com.  Or you can contact me on Ravelry as CailynDragon.

 

image

This work by Cailyn Meyer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

 

The Mystery of the Blue and Yellow Socks March 25, 2011

Filed under: patterns — Cailyn @ 2:45 pm
Tags: , ,

I’ve been working really hard on a secret project.  I’m not sure why I was keeping it so secret.  Maybe I was worried about jinxing it.

 

Suzan, the owner of Barking Dog Yarns, asked me to design a pattern for her monthly Knit-A-Long (KAL).  This was around the end of February and I’m happy to say that the pattern is completely finished (bar the intro description which is always hard for me to write).  It will be the April KAL and you can join the group here on Ravelry if you want.  The pattern, Bubble Stream, will be just for the KAL until May when I’ll put it up here for free.

 

Suzan has a great set of colorways called “Opposites Attract.”  These are two coordinating 200-yard skeins that come as one colorway; each skein has the same colors but different ones are the main color or the accent in each.  Did that make sense?  I’m having trouble thinking, there’s a cat sprawled on my face.  I really love the idea behind Opposites Attract and I hope she keeps coming up with new colorways!  Here’s a picture (stolen from the BD website since I didn’t take my own) of the one that I used for Bubble Stream, Tristan & Isolde:

 

 

Here’s the teaser that I posted in the Barking Dog Ravelry group:

Are you ready for a top down sock with a mirrored design? How about a partially patterned gusset? Don’t you love textured ribbing? What will it take to get you into this sock? Unique decreases? We’ve got that! And, just for this month, I’ll even knock of 10% of the knitting time!

Ahem, enough of the sales pitch. I think you’ll enjoy this sock pattern; I certainly enjoyed making it! The socks use Opposites Attract yarn- mine are in Tristan & Isolde. The sock is stretchy and fits up to an 8” foot circumference.

I’ll release the whole pattern here on April 1st (no foolin’ I promise!) This is my first KAL; I’m very excited!

 

 

This is indeed the first KAL that I will be “running” or at least more actively involved in.  There have been many KALs using my patterns, but I haven’t been a part of them.  Here’s hoping it goes well!

 

Salmon Run March 12, 2011

Filed under: patterns — Cailyn @ 11:38 pm
Tags: , , ,

I’ve got another pattern for sale up on Knit Picks!  This one uses one of their new yarns, Chroma.  Chroma is a fingering or worsted weight that transitions slowly from one color to another, like Noro or Mochi.  But much softer!

 

IMG_5014

 

My new pattern is Salmon Run.  Stupid name, you think?   A “salmon run” is the time when salmon swim back up the river that they were born in to reproduce. The rivers are choked with salmon during a run. The stitch pattern on these socks, made to wave with yarn overs and decreases, evokes the flowing river and leaping salmon, swimming past fishermen and bears to get to their birthplace.  The stitch pattern looks like salmon leaping in a river (at least it does if you squint).  And the socks are knit toe up- or “upstream,” if you will.  I love the strong vertical stitch pattern looks against the color changes of Chroma.

 

The wavy pattern (from my Russian book!) is made with yarn overs and decreases; they may look like cables, but they’re not.  The sock also have a gusset and slip stitch heel flap, like my Arthurian Anklets.  What they don’t have is ribbing.  The stitch pattern goes right to the end.

 

IMG_5010

 

The pattern has instructions for avoiding an ugly color change after the heel and for a stretchy sewn bind off, shown to be superior in this post.

 

IMG_5006   IMG_5009

 

I’m really happy with how these turned out.  I enjoyed working with Chroma- it’s soft and colorful and doesn’t split too much.  I’m even happy with the pictures, which you’ll notice were not taken outside as per usual.  I wanted to photograph the socks by the river, maybe even in the water and splashing a little.  I finished these socks just as a big snowstorm hit Seattle a few weeks ago, so I couldn’t take those pictures.  Then it poured rain for the next week.  When it was finally sunny, I went out to take pictures with Lowell… and just as we were setting up, it started to rain buckets.  I gave up at that point.  Lowell set up a lovely photo studio and we took pictures of the socks indoors.   I have carefully cropped out any cat paws that snuck into the pictures.  I can’t thank him enough for helping me get this done!!