The Daily Skein

All the craft that’s fit to make.

Weaving in Ends May 5, 2008

Filed under: knitting tutorials,Tutorials — Cailyn @ 7:51 pm
Tags: ,

Hate dealing with the nightmare of weaving in ends? Are leftover strands of yarn ruining your life? Do you have two, three, or even seven projects unfinished because of this problem? Ask your doctor about Weavendix, the revolutionary drug to solve this problem for you!

Or you can just look at my tutorial.

Weaving in ends as you knit is perhaps the best trick I’ve ever learned to help my knitting. I use it all the time, whether I’m just joining a new ball or joining a new color. If you’ve done a lot of colorwork, you probably do this all the time, but might not realize the full extent of its usefulness! I didn’t. I particularly love using this trick when I’m working Fair Isle in the round, because if you weave in the new tail before the end of the current round, there are no holes on the side when you switch colors. I mention this technique in my Fingerless Gloves patterns, so master this to make those patterns easier. Without further ado:

I’ve set up these pictures with a small piece of knitting in the round in green on one circular needle. I’m about 3/4 of the way done with the round and it’s time to join a new color, in this case grey. I’ll show the “easy” way to do this first, then right/left handed instructions that are a little faster. It’s essentially the same no matter which way you do it.

Step One: Place your new yarn (grey) over your working yarn (green), leaving a short tail (since you won’t need to weave the tail in, you don’t need a long one, although you can still weave the tail in, if you’re worried about security. I’ve certainly never done that. *cough*) The tail should be on the right.

Step Two: Without moving the new yarn, knit your next stitch as normal. Tada! The new yarn is now trapped (although not yet locked in, it needs a few more stitches.)

Step Three: Grab the new yarn and move it over the working yarn. Without moving the new yarn, knit your next stitch.

Step Four: Move the new yarn under the working yarn. Insert your needle into the next stitch, then go under the new yarn and grab the working yarn to complete your stitch.

Just repeat steps three and four until you reach the point of knitting with the new yarn!

Now, for a slightly faster way. The basic idea is the same, (actually it’s exactly the same) but instead of dropping the new yarn each time, you “weave” by wrapping the new yarn around the needle. I learned this technique here: Sock Pron. The right and left instructions are essentially identical, but I’ll put up pictures for both. If you can knit with both hands, it’s great to work the new yarn in your other hand (in my case, my right hand, but that’s not shown.)

Right-handed knitters:

Setup: Knit to the point of joining the new yarn. Insert the needle into the next stitch. Hold the tail of the new yarn against the project and *drape the new yarn from right to left over the needle.

Wrap the working yarn around the needle as normal…

and pull the working yarn under the new yarn and through the stitch.

Knit the next stitch as normal.*

Repeat from * to * until you’re done! It doesn’t matter whether you end on a draping stitch or a plain knit stitch.

Left-handed knitters (near and dear to my heart):

Setup: Knit to the point of joining the new yarn. Insert the needle into the next stitch. Hold the tail of the new yarn against the project and *drape the new yarn from right to left over the needle.

Wrap the working yarn around the needle as normal and pull the working yarn under the new yarn and through the stitch.

Knit the next stitch as normal.*

Repeat from * to * until you’re done! Again, it doesn’t matter whether you end on a draping stitch or a plain knit stitch.

You might have noticed that what you’re doing is wrapping the new yarn in the opposite direction that you wrap the working yarn to make a stitch. Pretty cool, huh?

This is what the work looks like on the the from and back when you’re done. Sometimes this method works better than other times; if the two yarns are very different colors (like black and white) you might be able to see the woven yarn through the work. (That happened to me.) This can also be a problem if the gauge is really loose. But overall, this is a great technique to make colorwork or just finishing easier!

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2 Responses to “Weaving in Ends”

  1. […] Charts are available in color and symbols below and in the PDF. To make finishing less painful, weave in ends as you go by twisting/wrapping the last yarn for 10-15 sts on the new row. Try joining the new color 10- 15 […]

  2. […] Daily Skein’s blog has a nice set of pictures […]


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